Oregon Newspaper Archive


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Abstract:

50 news clippings from an “independent paper devoted to the interests of the people.”

Notes:

The text below is raw OCR and has not been proofread. Contact us if you’d like to help!


The project of finding these old clippings depends on the status of OCR based searches, which are never 100% — there are always going to be more present than found, and results will also vary over time as OCR re-processing is often redone on collections as methodologies improve. [-S.K., 2023]


Oregon Newspaper Archive

compiled by Steven Kolins
published in The Advocate
Portland, OR: 1923-1927
























































Uncorrected raw OCR text PDF image scan with OCR

CLIPPING #: 1
https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1923-05-05/ed-1/seq-4/
Article Title: The advocate., May 05, 1923, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: May 5, 1923

0 : “FEAST or TH! ELRIZWAN
Saturday evening, tho 23th. more
than half an hundnvl of friends met
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. W
l-atimer. 397 East 311th street N., in
Rose City Park, through invitation
of the hosts, to participate in and en­
joy the Feast of the KI Riswan. KI
Riswan is a Persian word, the meaning
of which is the combination of host,
invitations and gut-ata. The major
ity of those in attendance were Ba
haista or friends of the movement,
which teaches the brotherhood of
man and the fatherhood of God A
delightful program was enjoy«»d. in
which George Latimer gave a brief
explanation of the feast, a resume
of his trip to the Holy Land. where
he visited, ate. and talked with the
late Abdul Baha; a group of Cad
man’s pieces, and the Juba dance by
Nathaniel Dett were played by Mrs
Daisy Hunt. Dr. Minard, of the
Divine Science church, gave a
brief talk on unity; Mrs. Baker, a
sister-in-law of Ray Stannard Baker,
here from California, gave an inter­
esting talk on the “Soul”; Mrs. Lati­
mer read a delightful letter, written
at sea. from Miss Martha Root, who
is now teaching the cause in Japan.
The letter was most charming and
was brimful of information an»l love
for the friends in America. Mrs. E. D.
Cannady gave a talk of her associa­
tion and knowledge* ot the work, and
expressed deep appreciation for the
beautiful teaching of Abdul Baha and
Baha Ollah. Following the spiritual
side of the feast, the guests partici­
pated in tbe material side, which con­
sisted of delicious ice cream, cakes,
candies, coffee, etc. During the so
cial hour. Mrs. Cannady sang Oth­
ers noted among the guests were Mrs.
Jack Gulliford ot Dawson. Y T . and
Mrs. Ruth Flowers of East First
street. ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1923-05-05_ed-1_seq-4.pdf
[11 MB]
CLIPPING #: 2
https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1923-06-02/ed-1/seq-1/
Article Title: The advocate., June 02, 1923, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: June 2, 1923

0 : “THE FEAST OF THE BAB
A very delightful evening was en­
joyed at the home ot Mr. and Mrs.
J. W. Latimer, 397 East 38th street
North. Wednesday, when members
and friends of the Bahai movement
met to commemorate the advent of
the announcer of the teachers of the
religion. The Bab.
George Latimer, in a very inter­
esting and vivid manner told ot the
life and work of the Bab. Mohamud
tyrdom. This was followed by a vo­
cal solo by Mrs. E. D. Cannady. Mrs.
Wm. Reese gave a group of readings
which were beautifully done and
heartily received.
New faces noted in the group ot
more than half an hundred were
Me*dames E. J Magruder and Wm.
Reese and A. H. Morrow. ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1923-06-02_ed-1_seq-1.pdf
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CLIPPING #: 3
https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1923-08-04/ed-1/seq-4/
Article Title: The advocate., August 04, 1923, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Aug. 4, 1923

0 : “BAHAI ASSEMBLY NEWS
Room 312 Central Building ” ,

1 : “Public Invited
Every Friday Evening
On last Friday it was the good for-
tune of all who attended to hear a
very illuminating address by Miss
A. Glenn of Seattle from the subject
“A New Call to Old Ideas” Miss
Glenn is an active Bahaist and makes
a splendid representative of the
teaching» of the brotherhood of man
Mis* Glen 1 explained some of the
principles of the Bahai philosophy
ind told bow the nine leading teach­
er* of religion have appeared in
different ages and instructed
people in the language which
people coaid best understand
which was adapted to their respec­
tive civilisations. “When Christ made
his advent and gave bl* law of love,
the people of that time had advanced
in power* ot perception and there
fore an ‘eye for an eye and a tooth
f.w a tooth’ were no more.” she said,
and added: “Baha O’llah and Abdul
Baha taught the people in accord­
ance with their present day powers
of perception.”
Miss Glenn said, in speaking of ” ,

2 : “their departure from the world.
Mra. Glenn said:
“They leave physically but leave a
renewal ot the age-old (deals or prin­
ciple* ot Goddike perfection.” The
Bahai philosophy will eras* all boan
dary llnee, she said, not only ot states
but of nations, aa the spirit of the
age la stealing over them unaware*.
The speaker said that many are
clinging to their old tradition* and
missing the beautiful spirit of the
age while others are enjoying It.
“Heretofore we have not recognized
the oneness of humanity but we
have now; we have learned that we
are really not only part of each
other but are really each other, and
whatever we do to each other, we
am doing to ourselvea. She com
pared the Bahai revelation t- the
diamond and said that as the dia­
mond possessed all the colors, yet It
becomes a perfect white stone, so
the Bahai religion represents a blend­
ing-a universal It inx of all religion*
iato a perfect oae.
Miss Ctnita Nunan and Mr. A. Pe­
terson told ot their trip to California
where they spent a most pleasant
time as the guests of Mr and Mrs
John Bosh at Geyserville. California
Miss Nunan’s description of her visit
with her brother Paul Alleu at La
guna Beach, whom she had not seen
tor more than 13 years, was most in
teresting. And perhaps the most
significant thing about it was. she
found that her brother was méditât-
ing on and studying the same philos-
ophy as she was. although up until
she came be had not heard of the Ba
hai philosophy.
Mrs C. Wass presided over the
meeting. Mr. Bowman read the
prayer and Mrs. D. G. Hunt rendered
the musical numbers.
Miss Glenn is visiting with Mrs.
George W Latimer. 397 East 38th
street. North, for several weeks.
Dr. E C. Pierce. 431 Benton street,
will address the assembly on “Psy­
cho-analysis” Friday evening, the
10th. ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1923-08-04_ed-1_seq-4.pdf
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CLIPPING #: 4
https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1924-02-09/ed-1/seq-4/
Article Title: The advocate., February 09, 1924, Page 4, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Feb. 9, 1924

0 : “NOTED ARCHITECT VISITS
Charles Mason Remey ot Boston.
Mass . stent severs! days in the city
thia week as the house guest ot Mr.
and Mrs. George W Latimer. 397 E
38th street, N. Mr. Remey gave sev-
eral lectures at the Metaphysical LI-
brarv during hl» stay here and was
royally entertained by numerous
friends. His extensive travels both In
this country and abroad, bls keen In
sight into human nature aud Interna-
tional questions make him a moat In-
teresting conversationallsL
Mr. Remey is s staunch disciple of
the teachings ot Abdul Baha. and was
member of a party ot believers who
visited the wonderful teacher in the
holy land before he passed a little
more than a year ago.
In speaking of the “Race question”
Mr Remey’s idea of an ideal society
where every individual not only
tolerates every other individual, but
actually loves. He says that the dif­
ferent races have a great attraction
for each other aud until the spiritual
and moral ideal of social Intercourse
formed, there will always be mis­
understanding and strife aa a result
of the physical relations between the
races. Mr. Rem- y’s talks were high-
ly educational and illuminating ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1924-02-09_ed-1_seq-4.pdf
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CLIPPING #: 5
https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1924-03-15/ed-1/seq-4/
Article Title: The advocate., March 15, 1924, Page 4, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: March 15, 1924

0 : “JACKIE COOGAN TO HELP NEAR
EAST
NEW YORK. March IS. Jackie
Coogan will forsake the movies for
ten weeks thia summer In order to
lead a modern “Children’s Crusade”
throughout the Culled States In an
appeal to the children of America for
a million dollar shipload of food
stuffs for the destitute orphan chll-
dren of the Near East and then will
sail in person to deliver the gifts to
the Near East orphans in Greece.
Palestine and Syria, it became
known here today when Charles V.
Vickrey. General Secretary of the
Near East Relief, made public a let­
ter from Mr. John H. (Jack) Coogan.
Jackie’s father, giving hla consent to
the trip.
Both Mr. and Mrs. Coogan are to
accompany Jackie on hla trip tu the
Near East and all expenses will be
paid by them.
It Is estimated that about ten weeks
will be required for the campaign
and the return trip to the near east­
ern countries to be visited.
For Sale Fur coat. 5. Broadway
5807. Adv.
MAKE YOUR APPOINTMENT
at
ELISE W. REYNOLDS HOME
BEAUTY PARLOR
Scientific Scalp and Facial Massage
Treatments fo* Dandruff, Falling
Hair and Baldnesa
Hair Weaving
Hair Dreselng and Manicuring
DE NELO METHOD
391 Roselawn Avenue
Phone Walnut 1884
WELL KNOWN BAHAI TEACHER’
HERE
Mr». Ida Finch of Seattle, who has
been teaching the Bahai principles to
the natives in Japan and China. Is
spending a week or ten days in Port­
land as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. J.
W I-atlmer, 397 East 38th St.. North.
Mrs Finch delivered a wonderful ad­
dress on Spiritual Successes at the
Center In the Central Building, Fri­
day evening, the 14th, to an apprecia­
tive audience. ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1924-03-15_ed-1_seq-4.pdf
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CLIPPING #: 6
https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1924-03-29/ed-1/seq-1/
Article Title: The advocate., March 29, 1924, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: March 29, 1924

0 : “MRS. FINCH AN EXCELLENT
SPEAKER
Before a group of Interested ones
a few evenings ago, Mrs. Ida Finch
recently returned from Japan, dis­
cussed “Hucceeslve Divine Manifesta­
tions.’* Mrs Finch uld that every­
thing moved In a cycle and that the
advanced age required advanced
teachers. Rhe uld that Abdul lfaha
was the promised one. and that Just
as Christ In His time taught the
people spiritually, so did Abdul Baha
In this day. Music was furnished by
Mrs. Saunders.
Mrs. Finch, who Is the houseguest
of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Latimer, has
filled a number of speaking engage­
ments since coming to Portland, and
has been royally entertained socially. ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1924-03-29_ed-1_seq-1.pdf
[11 MB]
CLIPPING #: 7
https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1924-03-29/ed-1/seq-4/
Article Title: The advocate., March 29, 1924, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: March 29, 1924

0 : “A GRIPPING STORY OF CHINA’S
AWAKENINQ
Many readers of The Advocate will
remember the lovely, beautiful soul
Martha Root who sojourned amongst
ps a little while, giving of her pre-
*clous thoughts and radiating ber love
before she sailed to do her great
work In China. Through the kind-
of Mr and Mr* J’ W l**Umer
our Interest has been aroused In the
Bahai movement which Is attracting
the attention of thinking people all
over the world as a means to the so­
lution ot the various problems which
exist among men today, and for the
privilege ot revealing the contents ot
the marvelous manuscript, the first
Installment of which here follows,
and the remainder will be published
In successive weekly Installments:
CHINA TODAY
By Martha L. Root
No country In the world today is
viewed with more Intense Interest
than Is China China with Its popu
latlon ot more than 43S.OOO.OOO soula.
If the population of Austria-Hungary.
Belgium. Francq, Germany. Italy,
England. Scotland. Ireland. Wales.
Japan. Serbia and Roumania had all
been wiped out in the great war.
these countries could have been re­
populated by Chinese and leave
enough residents In China to give a
population as dense as that of the
United States. The present republic
of China extends over an area of
about five million square miles; a
great deal more than twice that of
the United States, Thia estimate, of
course. • includes Mongolia. Man-
churia. Tibet and Eastern Turkes
tan. In addition to the eighteen prov-
Inces which make up China proper
For a traveler to encircle China he
will need to journey a distance con-
siderably greater than half the dr-
c-umference of the globe.
China will be the country of the
future. With her great population
and ber vast latent resources hardly
touched, she has Immense potential ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1924-03-29_ed-1_seq-4.pdf
[11 MB]
CLIPPING #: 8
https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1924-04-19/ed-1/seq-4/
Article Title: The advocate., April 19, 1924, Page 4, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: April 19, 1924

0 : “CHINA TODAY
By Martha Root
(Continued from last week )
The ancient Confucian God idea*
five thousand years ago. was mono-
theism. It was a groat preparation
for later world teachers, It recog-
nlzed a power above, great, benlfi-
cent and just, who rewards vlrtue
and punishes vice, and who can be
aproached In prayer.
Shangtl or T’len (these words mean
tn the Chinese what God means to
the westerner) gives birth to the peo­
ple. gives blessing to the good and
woes to the evil. He ordains the so­
cial order, the religious and social
ceremonies and human virtues, He
sends down rain. He to gracious to
men and helps them, His will Is un­
erring. He does not shorten men’s
Ilves, they do that themselves. He
to not bound to individuals by ties of
biased human affection. He com
mands men to rectify their character
He gives man his nature, compassion­
ates him and grants bls desires. He
to only moved by virtue, but men may
cry and weep and pray to Him. for
He will hear.” Christians say “We
know that God to personal,” Confu­
cianism say, “We do not know, for
we have no way of finding out what
God Is like.” This agnosticism Is
characteristic of the Chinese, God
exists but he remains the unknow-
able. This to the creed of Confu-
cianlsm.
Now a new spirit dawn is rising
over China the Bahai movement to
lighting columns of the newspapers;
universities, colleges, normal schools
and middle schools, churches and
other orginazatlons are offering their
platforms for lectures on the univer­
sal principles of Baha’u’llah. Col­
leges. Confuclantot. Christian, Mo­
hammedan. Buddhist, Taoist and ag
noetic have given Invitations to lec­
ture, and these were accepted.
(To be continued.) ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1924-04-19_ed-1_seq-4.pdf
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CLIPPING #: 9
https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1924-04-26/ed-1/seq-4/
Article Title: The advocate., April 26, 1924, Page 4, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: April 26, 1924

0 : ”
CHINA TODAY
(By Martha Root).
(Continued from last week.)
Newspapers have run series of ar­
ticle*. feature stories, cut of Abdul
Bahs and of the Bahai temple In Chi­
cago. These papers were Chinese.
English, Japanese (ia China). Rus­
sian and even Bolshevist journals
have carried the universal principles.
Abdul Baha. the center of the
extant of the Bahai revolution,
great hopes of China. He said:
China one can teach many souls,
train and educate such divine person­
age«, each one of whom may be­
come the bright candle of the world
of humanity. Truly, I say they are
free from any deceit and hypocrisies,
and are prompted with ideal motive« ”
The vast republic of China seems
to be a nation “prepared” by five ” ,

1 : “thousand years getting ready for the
universal principle* of Baha’n’llah.
The people are attracted to th* Ba­
hai movement because it* basic Ideals
are “big enough.” a* they «ay, “for
them ” Coasldar these principles.
1. Th* oneness of th* world of hu­
manity thia agree* with their Con
fnctan teaching “All within the four
sea* «re brethren ”
2. Independant lnv**ttgauon of
truth It ia on* of the main atm* of
the Renaissance movement.
(To be continued.)
ARTIST VISITS ADVOCATE
OFFICE
Clareac* Cameroa White, noted
race violinist, who appeared in re­
cital here Wednesday evening, was
a pleasant caller at The Advocate of-
tic« Wednesday and spent some lit-
tie whll« chatting with the staff and
recalling th« pleasant days spent
when ha was here several years a*o
in recital ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1924-04-26_ed-1_seq-4.pdf
[11 MB]
CLIPPING #: 10
https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1924-05-10/ed-1/seq-1/
Article Title: The advocate., May 10, 1924, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: May 10, 1924

0 : “SPEAKER • AT BAHAI CONGRESS ATTACKS NORDIC SUPERIORITY ” ,

1 : “An attack upon tbe theory of the
superiority ot tbe Nordic races mark­
ed the speech of Rev. Dr. John Her­
man Randall at the first public meet­
ing at the Bahai congress in the
Bancroft hotel last night. One
hundred followers of the Bahai phil­
osophy from all parts of the country
convened Saturday night in this city.
The congress will end tomorrow
night.
“Sience has proven that humans
of whatever races are equal.” assert­
ed Rev. Dr. Randall, who is pastor of
the Community church of New York.
“The scientists have examined the
blood and even the body tlsuea of the
various races and have been unable
to find any difference that would In­
dicate superiority or inferiority.”
The colored race, the clergyman
contended, waa tn no way inferior to
a……………………………………. ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1924-05-10_ed-1_seq-1.pdf
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CLIPPING #: 11
https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1924-05-24/ed-1/seq-4/
Article Title: The advocate., May 24, 1924, Page 4, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: May 24, 1924

0 : “CHINA TODAY
By Martha Root
(Continued from last week )
(7) Universal Peace ie one of the
moot vital issues among the educated
classes of China today They are
eager to know about the Bahai move­
ment. to learn Its constructive pro­
gram tor a world peace. They aay:
“We hope for a genuine and lasting
internationalism–an internationalism
that Is baaed not on treaties and cov­
enants which can be torn up; an
internationalism which I* based not
on clever Interpretations of carefully
worded powers, but an interpreta­
tion based upon the unity of Interest,
unity of thought, unity of aim* and
hopes and ualty of heart*. We stu-
dents of China are ready. What wlll
students of other nations do?” (This
is something when one know* how
enemies are encroaching upon Chi­
nese sovereignty. They are not us
ing blind hatred, but a faith that uni­
versal world brotherhood will eventu­
ally triumph.)
(81 Universal Education Dr. P.
W Kuo. president of Southeastern
University, Nanking, wa* one of the
leading advocate« of universal edu­
cation at the world conference on
education, held in San Francisco In
1323. He said to the writer the oth-
ed day: “The universal principles
of Bahá’u’lláh will be favorably re­
ceived in China. One of our deans
has become so interested in universal
education that he has been willing
to give up his deanship to promote
1L He is now the general secretary
of the new national popular educa­
tion movement of China.”
(To be continued) ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1924-05-24_ed-1_seq-4.pdf
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CLIPPING #: 12
https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1924-08-09/ed-1/seq-4/
Article Title: The advocate., August 09, 1924, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Aug. 9, 1924

0 : “SOCIETY NOTES
Kansas Matron* Royally Entertained
Two of the most widely feted visi­
tors here this Summer were Mr*. P.
Bell of Wichita. Kans , and her
sister. Mrs. James H. Clayborn* of
Kansas City. Kansas, who arrived
Wednesday night, July 30. from Cali­
fornia (where they had spent a won­
derful time) and remained a week
th* house guests of Editor and Mrs
D. Cannady. Both are charming
young matron*, popular in club, fra­
ternal. church and social circle* in
their respective home*. Thursday af­
ternoon they dined at the Y. M. C. A.
Thursday evening they were among
the out-of-town guest* at a reception
given at the beautiful home of Mr.
and Mrs Josef A Wisdom. 1512
Union Ave.. North Friday evening
they attended a lecture at Central
Building At which time George Orr
Latimer gave a splendid recital of
the activities of the Bahai Conven­
tion recently held in Worcester.
Mass., which he attended in a repre­
sentative capacity from the Assembly
Portland. At the close of the lec­
ture. Mrs. Clara Anderson presided
over a delicious Chinese supper
served a la Chinese at a downtown
Chinese Cate. Saturday morning
they were the guests of Mrs. Dora
Gulllford at the Electronic Clinic of
Dr. Chester and Dr Mabie Easter. ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1924-08-09_ed-1_seq-4.pdf
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https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1924-08-16/ed-1/seq-1/
Article Title: The advocate., August 16, 1924, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Aug. 16, 1924

0 : “The Advocate)
she established in this little town of
* i« .— Mai — this center t •
investigation of religions, which meant
,he reality of the religions, of science
and philosophy, and the influences of
the world that are of value,
j
have been very much interested in
tfle
work of Green Acre for the past
or seven years. The first year
ot|C
of the great lights was there, Ed-
war(J Hafc and #
…… .’
interesting story, I think. It shows the
great spirit of that man shows how
the trouble of meeting a certain issue
that we have confronting us in the
United States of America is easily
overcome through association and good
fellowship. The first time that Booker
T. Washington arrived in Boston, he
had a great heavy suit case, and he
heard a voice behind him saying, “Let
me help you,” and when he looked
around a hand was put down to help
him, and this person who put down a
helping hand was Edward Everett
Hale. Booker T. Washington, I found
out also this summer, he had gone
down and spoken at Green Acre con­
ferences.
It has gone on all through these
years and it is now entering on its 31st
season. These ideals have been held
forth: the emancipation and the free­
dom of the various shackles that are
holding civilization back. It is no won­
der such a movement as the Youth
movement has come into existence.
The fact is that crumbling civilization,
different aspects of the civilization of
today, have left thinking humanity to
work out its own pathways, to see the
clearer horizon again. I think that in
all relationships with the world that this
great spirit of imbuing a spiritual un­
derstanding of the religions of the
world outside of our own. a recognition
of the equal rights of other race«, and
of all sects in the world, and recogniz­
ing that science is in the world to de­
velop religion, to enlarge the vision of
religion, and also to take in the scope
of different capacities, that we have
been created from the same divine
power with the right to equal oppor­
tunity to develop our capacities. If we
understand such things as that, then
we have already entered into the new
era. It is a question very often of edu­
cation, environment, or one condition
ed a rather small and what is known
as an aristocratic college in New Eng­
land. This college has had very few
students from the South, that is colored
students, although when I was in col­
lege we didn’t consider it aristocratic
at all but considered there was a great
deal of democratic spirit in the col-
lege. But in the graduating class the
highest honors this year were given to
a colored student, and the next high­
est honors were not awarded at all,
and this colored student, perhaps the
only one, was asked to give the ora­
tion by the class. Recently a contest
was held to judge the poetry of the
undergraduate world. The poems were
submitted without name and without
distinction of the color or sex. The
first prize was given to a colored stu­
dent of Columbia University. You can
see by this that superiority, as we con­
sider it in races, does not exist at all
where the conditions are not known.
That is the little keynote of what
they have found the Bahai Spirit means
to the world.
—0— ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1924-08-16_ed-1_seq-1.pdf
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https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1924-09-13/ed-1/seq-4/
Article Title: The advocate., September 13, 1924, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Sept. 13, 1924

0 : “Prominent Lecturer Here
From New York City
Mr and Mr*. Howard MacNutt and
Mr*. Julia M Grundy arrived in Port­
land Thursday for a aerie* of Bahai
lecture*. They are on tour through
the United State* and will attend the
Bahai convention to be held in San
Francisco September 26. 27. 28
Mr*. Grundy is the authoress of
“Ten Days in the Light of Acea” and
ha* traveled extensively in the interest*
of the Bahai movement.
Mr. MacNutt is the author of “Unity
Through Love” and the compiler of
the two volume* of Abdul Bsha’s
American Addresses known a* “’The
Promulgation of Universal Peace ‘
He entertained Abdul Baha during hi*
visit to America in 1912 and was in­
strumental in obtaining voice record*
and moving pictures of the fajnous
prophet from Persia.
Mr MacNutt wa* one of the speak­
er* at the First Amity Congress held
in Washington, D. C„ for the purpose
of Creating a better understanding be­
tween the race*.
They will apesk at the following
public place* during their
visit to
Portland :
Friday evening, 8 o’clock, at Bahai
assembly, room …. Central — building.
Saturday evening. 8 o’clock, with
Portland branch library, 190 Kiltings-
worth; “World Unity and It* Ac­
complishment.”
Sunday morning, II o’clock, at First
Divine Science church, East 25th and
Clay streets; subject, “The New Era.”
Sunday evening, 8 o’clock, at Bethel
A. M. E. church, corner Larrabee and
McMillen streets. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., September 20, 1924, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Sept. 20, 1924

0 : “Noted Bahaist Speaks at
Bethel
Howard McNutt, of New York City,
author and lecturer of note, delivered
wonderful speech at Bethel A. M. E.
Church last Sunday night. The full
text of his speech has been sent in for
publication 400 late for this issue.
W’atch next week’s Advocate for it.
—0— ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., September 27, 1924, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Sept. 27, 1924

0 : “•
New York Man Prominent
In Bahai Movement Ad­
dresses Representative
Audience at Bethel. ” ,

1 : “On last Sunday night at Bethel A.
M. ‘ E. Church, Howard MacNutt,
prominent Bahai lecturer, author and
philosopher, gave a most illuminating
address on the Bahai religion to a
representative audience.
Mr. MacNutt was introduced by
George Orr Latimer, leader in the
work locally, and who ts loved by all
races in the city. Mr. MacNutt stressed
the point of rightful reconciliation in
religious views instead of trying to
force one view as against the other
Mr. MacNutt said: “Whlln argument
creeps in, the Word of God and the
Spirit of God goes out.” He said the
special point the Bahai Revelation ®is
teaching all over the world is the point
of reconciliation between man and man.
and that the purpose of God in all the
holy books of whatever religious teach-
ing, is ultimately to bring man to-
gether in peace, and brotherhood, in
the knowledge and love of God.
Mr. MacNutt’» address was replete
with rich metaphors. Many pro­
claimed Mr. MacNutt’» explanation of
the Bahai movement more clarifying
than any they had previously heard.
Miss Grundy, who accompanied Mr.
and Mrs. McNutt here, sang Burleigh’s
“Deep River” and “Nobody Knows
the Trouble I’ve Seen,” accompanied ” ,

2 : “the Trouble I’ve Seen,” accompanied
by Mr. MacNutt.
The MacNutt party motored from
New York here and thence to San
Francisco, Cal., to attend the Amity
Convention of the Bahai movement.
. __________PENCIL
PENCIL CO.
EURIKA COMB IS HERE
shampoo dryer or straightening comb,
EURIKA is in a class alone, the greatest
cash is sent with your order. If you
dollars and a few cents poetage. Address
Portland, Oregon. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., December 13, 1924, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Dec. 13, 1924

0 : “The Portland Branch of the N. A. A.
C. P. continues to hold regular, earn­
est. meetings at which time members
are added to the roll. This organiza­
tion bids fair to excel any other in the
city among the Race. At the last meet­
ing held, 21 members were enrolled for
the ensuing year. Some were renew­
als, however, but there is an ever in­
creasing number of new members.
Jinab-I-Fadil, a great Persian phi­
losopher and lecturer who will be in
the city during the month of January
under the auspices of the Bahai Center,
will speak for the Association at its
regular meeting the second Monday
night in January, being the 12th. His
subject will be “Conquest of Preju­
dice. ‘ Dr. Fadil is rated as one of the
deepest thinkers of the age, and he was
among those named by Abdul Baha
before his ascension, upon whom the
mantel of teacher would fall. Plans
are being made by the Association to
make this the biggest event of the year
in the Association. The drive for new
members continues indefinitely.
—0—
Look! One Hundred Per ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., January 03, 1925, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Jan. 3, 1925

0 : “—o—
Bahais Get Together
For the pleasure of meeting Jinab-I-
Fadil and his interesting wife and
children. Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Latimer
entertained a few friends at their home
in Rose City Park on the evening of
January 1st.
—o— ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., January 03, 1925, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Jan. 3, 1925

0 : “Jinab-I-Fadil
» • «
Portland will be honored the
month of January by having in its
presence Jinab-I-Fadil. great
Persian philosopher and leader in
the Bahai eause. Dr. Fadil is con­
sidered by many the greatest liv­
ing expounder of Brotherhood of
man. He has closely contacted
the great Abdul Baha before he
passed more than a year ago. The
Portland Branch of the National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People feel greatly
honored to have him as their guest
and speaker during his sojourn in
the city. Dr. Fadil has eightv-
three subjects from which he win
speak during his month’s visit
here and so interesting are they
all that it is hard to choose one
among the many. Dr. Fadil is
said to be one of the greatest
philosophers of the age and among
the most learned. As an indica­
tion of his democracy he has mast­
ered the English language so that
he does not have an interpreter as
he had several years ago when he
visited Portland. It is to be hoped
that our people and as many
others as wish to, will fill the
places upon every occasion where
Dr. Fadil will speak while here.
All his lectures are free.
—o— ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., January 17, 1925, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Jan. 17, 1925

0 : “At its meeting Monday evening at
First A. M. E. Zion church, the Port­
land branch of the National Aasocia-
lion for the Advancement of Colored
People had a fine program featuring
Jinah-I-Eadil, Persian philosopher,
and teacher of the Bahai Movement.
Dr. Eadil discussed the “Conquest of
Prejudice” in a vivid, simple and quite
understandable way. Dr. Eadil was in­
troduced by George Orr Latimer, lead­
er in the local Bahai Movement. Miss
Shaw sang sweetly, Mrs. Jessie Ed­
wards played excellently and the Prcsi-
«lent, J A Ewing, and Corresponding
Secretary of the organization, Mrs. E.
D. Cannady made brief talks. At the
close of the program an informal re­
ception was held downstairs and every
lone enjoyed the entile affair. ’Ihe
church was completely filled for the
occasion and on every side one could
hear words of praise of Dr. Fadil’s
talk.
— — ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., January 17, 1925, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Jan. 17, 1925

0 : “—
Th* B|b|e Claa* i* growing in iu-
; lerest and in number*,
Phe annual meeting and membership
bamjuei was attended by ¿0 branch
member* and guc*t* and two High
School Reserve*,
l‘he High School Reserve* will hold
their Social Hour on Sunday at 4
M. A program wilt be rendered.
The Girl»’ Work Committee lia*
planned a progressive dinner for Janu-
ary the 20th.
Due to lack of interest the swim*
ming classes have been discontinued
until further notice,
Mrs. K Gray announces a member*
ship party for January the J.trd, when
all members, former members and
prospective members and all interested
in the work arc invited to be present.
Ail members in good standing have
been mailed ballots for the election
officers January ¿Stlt.
Jiuab-l-Fadil, the Persian philoso­
pher, was the interesting speaker
lh branch hr,div *,‘crnoon ”
sm,n bul *Pl’rec’u”ve group Mr
L,cor«e U’,,,,er oi ,h* »’^‘la.id Bahai
AiembI’ introduced the speaker.
Mr* A,u L’ Stevens. Oregon So
c“*. HKune Stall, will begin a sene.
*~,urC5 ‘° « ,h* brancb
on Tuesday, January the 20th, at
P. M , under the auspices of the
Mothers’ Club. The lectures arc free
°”,jr
The Blue Triangle Club will meet
F’ridav the lbth at 8 P. M.
The women interested in reading are
invited to meet at the Y. W. C. A,
Friday at 2, January the 16th. to or-
ganuc a club. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., February 21, 1925, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Feb. 21, 1925

0 : “—0—
Dies From Burns
Mr Hougen of Seattle, Wn., sus­
tained injuries by burning February
13 when an oil furnace exploded in his
home, which resulted in his death
Monday evening. Mr. Hougen was a
leader in Bahai circles in Seattle and
had a host of friends both in Portland
and his home city, who mourn his un­
timely and tragic end. Members from
the Bahai center in Portland motored
over Tuesday to attend the funeral.
—0— ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., April 04, 1925, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: April 4, 1925

0 : “‘April 25, at 12:15 noon, and we shall
appreciate your inviting any whom you
think would be interested in trying to
find out how l»ettcr lo get along with
each other.
Your recent address on the “Peace
Problems of Portland” before the Fel­
lowship was greatly appreciated and
believe will he productive of much
good and will help u* all to learn that
no matter what the pigment of our
‘ »kins we are all “just folks.”
Our Fellowship is a sort of spon­
taneous growth and a, a recent inert­
ing we had Bahaists, Roman Catholics,
Protestants, preachers, teachers, law­
yers, a letter carrier, housewives, mer­
chants, editors.
We are trying to learn how to live
on the same street, in the same town,
in the same country and in the same
world without mussing up thr place
where wc live with all sorts of fights
and anyone you know whom you think
would help in such discussion I wish
you would invite. As the -iie of ihe
room is limited, we shall appreciate it
if any of your readers who plan to
come will make reservations through
your office. Cordially yours,
J. J. HANDSAKER. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., May 02, 1925, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: May 2, 1925

0 : “—0—
The Bahai Movement in America is
one of the greatest agencies of peace
and good-will amongst men of all races
and colors. Long may the movement
live and spread.
O ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., June 20, 1925, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: June 20, 1925

0 : “| Moslem Fanatics Slay
Persian Bahais
Outbreak o f Atrocities, Similar t o
Thoae by Which Major Imbrie Waa
Murdered, Reported to Local Bahai
Aasembly ” ,

1 : “That mob violence, in»tigatcd by
Mohammedan clerRy, ha» become pre­
valent in many part» of Persia, causing
act» of fanatical violence even more
atrocious in method than the a»»a»ina-
tion of Major Robert W Imbrie.
American Vice-Consul in Teheran,
last summer, is reported to the Bahá’ís
of Portland in letters from the Near
East, received by Mr J W. Latimer,
local secretary Major Imbrie. it has
hern testified by Americans in the city
at the time of the murder, was put to
death beiausr of his courageous pro­
tection of American llahai teachers
stationed in Teheran
These reports, based upon direct
communication with Bahai assemblies
throughout Persia, declare it is tvi
drill that the fresh outrages arc part of
deliberate attempt to subject the
liahais » of that country to wholesale
persecution without parallel tn civilized
countries during modern times ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., June 27, 1925, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: June 27, 1925

0 : “Prosecution Continues
Against Bahaists ” ,

1 : “Detailed instances of the persecu­
tion of Bahaists have been received
here by Secretary of the Bahai Group
in Portland, Mr, J W. Latimer from
the Near Hast. One report reads:
“In the village of (Jamsar, near Te­
heran, a Persian named Aqa Rida, a
recent convert, who had refused to re­
cant his faith, was thrown into the
river hy a mob headed by Aqa Ahmad,
son of a local Mullah, and afterward
tied to a tree and most cruelly beaten.
Still steadfast in his faith, the unfor­
…….r tunate man …… was … ……….. afterward v.Ks dragg
through the streets of Qamsar and
publicly tortured”
-O – – ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., September 26, 1925, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Sept. 26, 1925

0 : “The program given by the well-
wishers of First A- M F. Zion church
Thursday night, over which Xfrs. Dora
Gulliford presided, was a complete
success The program was an elabo­
rate one and found an artistic setting
on a stage beautifully decorated in
autumn lowers. The out-of-town par­
ticipants were Mrs. Luther of Seattle
who talked on the Bahai revelation,
and Edward (‘. Morgan who charmed
his audience with several selections on
hi« exquisite gold «axaphone
Fraternalisin was rpreseted bvTalks
and funds, led by O. S Thomas Mrs
Gulliford received deserved praise for
the staging of such a splendid pro­
gram for the benefit of the Xlaster’s
Cause. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., October 10, 1925, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Oct. 10, 1925

0 : “Thr Portland V^qinans Mutual Be­
nefit (. lub met Saturday evening at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. W. P Lomax,
1019 Fast 27th Street North Nineteen
ladies were present and Mrs. Idah
Brown, the president of the club, pre­
sided Miss Faye Swain and Mesdames
M D Campbell and E. D Cannady
furnished the tuuvir Favourite quota­
tions were given by each one. Mrs
Idah Finch, discussed the Bahai prin­
ciples and also told of the recent earth­
quake in Japan, and how she miracu­
lously escaped.
The hostess, assisted by Mine.
Thibodeaux-Vrisell, served dainty re­
freshments •
—O”” ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., October 17, 1925, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Oct. 17, 1925

0 : “—©-
BAHAI ASSEMBLY SCENE OF
INTERESTING LECTURE FRI. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., February 13, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Feb. 13, 1926

0 : “Albert T. Freeman a Sioux Indian
who has been lecturing for various
audiences lately, spoke Friday night
before the Bahai Assemblage at room
212 Central Bldg Tenth and Alder
Streets The meeting was open to thr
public. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., March 06, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: March 6, 1926

0 : “o
The Associate Editor of The Advo­
cate will deliver two addresses at the
Williamette University, Salem. Ore-
on Tuesday, March 9 At the Uni­
versity Chanel services at 11:25 and
before the Fellowship of Reconcilia­
tion at dinner at 6 p m.. On Friday
March 12th she will speak before
the Bahai Assembly, 2nd floor Cen­
tral Rldg , and on Sunday, March 14.
Mrs. Cannady will deliver the eleven
o’clock message to from 150 to 200
voung people at the Pioneer (white)
Methodist church. St. Johns. On a
«late later in the month, she will be
the speaker before a group of club
women in I.aurclhurst. Other invita­
tions cover several states which Mrs.
Cannadv will try and arrange to ac­
cept.
……. 0 — ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., March 20, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: March 20, 1926

0 : “Mrs. E D. Cannady addressed the
Bahai Assembly in the Central Bid.,
at its regular meeting on last Friday
evening, using for her subject, the N.
A. A. C. P. She 3Tso delivered the
Sunday message to the junior Pioneer
Methodist church in St. Johns last
Sunday morning and was well receiv­
ed at both places. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., March 27, 1926, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: March 27, 1926

0 : “The Bahai group observed their
New Year F’east at the home of Mr
and Mrs George I »timer in ose City
Park Sunday evening Among those
who had a few words to sav were
Mrs Dora Gulhford, Miss Margie
Danlev and Mr Presley Holliday
Mrs F D Cannadv sang a group of
Negro Spirituels
At thr close of the spiritual feast a
material feast in the form of good
things to eat was enjoyed ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., April 03, 1926, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: April 3, 1926

0 : “The Bahai Assembly, at the request
of Mo F I) Cannadv at the close
of her address delivered before that
body at the Central Bldg, on Friday
•w mil- ago, sent telegrams to
Senators McNary and Stanfield re­
questing them to support the Dver-
Mckinlcv nti-1 snching Bill The fol­
lowing replies w re received from the
Senators:
“Washington. D. C Mar 2*), 1926.
Purtland Bahai Assembly. Portland,
Oregon
Sympathies are w:*h the colored
people who have made such remark­
able progress since emancipation
Will give sympathetic consideration
all legislation along line Dyer-Mc*
Tea,COn‘i………„ Kinlev bill c
, __ . u „
, (Signed) R bert N Stanfield. U
Senator
Washington. D C Mar 20.1926
Portland Bahai Assembly. Portland.
Oregon
w,n give my support to passage ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., May 22, 1926, Image 6
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: May 22, 1926

0 : “MANY NATIONALITIES REPRE­
SENTED AT GATHERING AT
E. D. CANNADY HOME.
(Reprinted from the Portland Tele­
gram of May IS. 1926)
Interesting observance of Interna­
tional Good Will dav held Sunday af­
ternoon at the home of Mr and Mrs.
F D Cannadv, 520 E 2oih Street N
Those attending included 50 Amer­
icans, English, Spanish, Japanese,
Chinese and American Negroes Va­
rious religious faiths were represent­
ed intludii(g lewish, Bahaist, Roman
Catholic am! Protestant.
George Orr Latimer introduced the
honor guest of the afternoon, Mrs
Elirabeth Grccnlcaf of (. hicago and
Montreal Mrs Grernleaf is en route
home from attending the Bahai eon
senturn
Other speakers were Ken Nakatawa,
tin- Rev llatrold Griffis, Mrs | I
Handsakrr. Mrs Nathan Harris,
Mrs W F Smith, Mrs. Stanley t hin,
amt W. C Holliday.
1’iano numbers were given bv Mrs
Frank Holcomb and vocal numbers
by Mrs Mrs F. D. Cannadv. Mrs I
F lohnson and Miss Violet Hooker,
with Mrs lessir Edward, accompany
ing. Readings were given bv Mrs
Grcenlcaf and Miss Gwendolyn Hook­
er.
The tea table, with lavender color
scheme, was presided over by Mcs-
dams I. K Puvnta, M 1) Campbell,
Clara Bell and Miss Ruth fling ” ,

1 : “Mr Horace Holley of New York
City, well known author and philoso­
pher, a lecturer of international fame
will spend a few days in l’ortland
next week. Mr Holley has been in
SanFrancisco, Cal, where he attended
the lHth Annual Bahai Convention at
the Hotels Whitcomb and I’alaec.
Mr. Holley is a graduate of Wil­
liams College and has spent some
time in F.urope in research work He
is a brilliant speaker, highly intellect­
ual and spiritual and if present plans
materialize, he will deliver the even­
ing message at Bethel A. M F.
church next Sunday evening, May 23 ” ,

2 : “Mr. Louis Gregory who is to ad-
dress several gatherings in the city
during next week is a native of Wash
ington, D C where for some time
he was in the practice of law, and al­
so employed by the United States
Government for several years
For a number of years he has been
in the lecture field working in the in­
terest of the establishment of a uni­
versal Brotherhood; better under-1
standing between races and nations
Mr. Gregory has spoken in all the
large Eastern and Southern cities
last week In the Charleston contest
Recently he has attended a Bahai
Convention held in San Fracisco, Cal
ad has spoken before large audiences
in Los Angeles and Pasadena He is
e route Last and is stopping in Port­
land for a few days on this trip
Mr Gregory will speak Sunday ev­
ening at the F-lrst ( hristian church,
and on Sunday evening May the 30,
hr will speak before the Ccntcnarv-
Wilbrr M, E congregation. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., May 29, 1926, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: May 29, 1926

0 : “National Bahai Convention
(Continued from pax* our)
1,0 »’omenIs.
, An »iterestii«* i«*«« was
Ith« number of messages and
Rrct,ngs that eante Itom
,Vanv An’er,c*11 aiu
c,lu‘s- Another wus the ri
P”r‘ of progress of the
wor^ teaching and gum
‘»*i *?uls in all parts of the
‘vor^ to path of true
fr^’dom and light. I he joy*
,1U ,HSS harmony had a
i^l’cP ®nd far-reaclung Mgml
,c-’,u’c- A *OVl- *’s *“xpres-
1 ,at was »Jh^mltracmg,
,a,1. **av’S rhirny of vision
tand bound the hearts togeth-
icr‘
. * *H‘ |vo Pu,,c. meetings
,or. teaching, that is, making
points of contact with the
!«riat P«*»1’«. ,h,° ,Ha,‘-
(luct of hi Rid van and the o-
pen meeting held m the ball
room of the Palace, one of
the largest hotels of that cos-
mopolitan city. I he former
assembled more than three
hundred at the tables which
were all beautifully adorned
with flowers and favors. T he
latter filled the hall to over-
flowing. In both these lumin
ous gatherings colored A
mcricans were liberally rep­
resented, both among the
speakers and the auditors.
Music of the most entertain­
ing kind added to the joyous­
ness of both occasions. The
presence of white and color­
ed Americans, Chinese and
a” 1,1 «•« k'”i,-v
jllri cn, a *m l,rtMlm
charm to the meetings.
woman, v 11,11 in u iv anv , inciting D ,
Mr. LeKoy loas, a voting
here., * . *
business man, presided at the
by a ,, • , ‘ … ,
Kid van Least and Mrs. Ella
.. ..
‘ otiPl 1,1 xmmi mg a
note of welcome to the brtl-
… … . ,
liant gathering said: Tor-
.« ** , •.
give us if we are a little hil-
* . . • ,. i
‘r,ou‘ on,.*h‘
‘”«* ,n’“x,ca,c, ‘? ‘.'”‘V,””
,m 1 *’ (
arc s,Kn,f’can* °. a cl”sf’r
was amonK a” n’ank,”d-
w, I, happiness as the key
anthori- ao,.c . The annonncetncnl of
the l,aha ” llah’ wl”ch „ . .
i!!’/»T..]
a wave of happiness all over
the world.”
Among other speakers
were Mrs. May Maxwell and
Mrs. Elizabeth Gremirai of
Montreal, Mr. Albert Vail
and Mrs. Corintie True of
Chicago, Mrs. Stewart W.
French of Pasadena, Torao
Kawasski, the Japanese Con-•
sul. Shinji Yamasoto, a bov,
ami Louis G. Grcgorv. a col-
orcd lecturer from VVashing-
ton, D. C., who spoke on Ba-
ha’i courage.”
Great success attended the
public meeting for the teach-
ing and spread of the Bahá’í
‘ideals and principles of bro-
therhood. Mr. Horace Hoi-
‘ley presided and with fine ” ,

1 : “power of expression and ra
(liunl heart made a point of
contact for each of the four
speakers. Mrs. Elizabeth
Grcenlcaf, told of her recent
pilgrimage to the Holy Laud
and of meeting the brilliant
youth, Sliogbi Effendi, who
is now the Guardian of the
Bahá’í Cause. Mrs. May
Maxwell traced the history
of the movement, starting
with the Bab, the herald of
the new day of peace, and
then telling of the exalted
life and services to the world
of Itahu’u’lluh, the great
founder of the movement,
who though imprisoned and
exiled and meeting the most
intense opposition, yet suc­
ceeded in waving the banner
of victory over the East and
West and of drawing togath-
er peoples of every race and
religion, and of Ahhu’l Balia,
his son and successor, who
shared his father’s exile and
imprisonment, hut after his
release traveled far and wide
in disseminating the Bahá’í
ideals, visiting America in
1912 and shedding a wonder­
ful light upon public events.
Lotus G. Gregory spoke on
the Baha’i ideal of coopera­
tion ami the oneness of hu­
manity, demonstrating its
practical hearing upon A-
mcrican life ami its applica
tion to all races. Mr. Albert
R. Vail as the last speaker
gave a very eloquent address
on the unity of all religions
and the power of the Word
of God. It now appears that
all faiths should investigate
the ** Bahá’í Movement, which
without abrogating anything
that is valid and vital in any
religion, yet reveals the
means of peace and harmony
for all. To the earnest seek­
er a new spiritual conscious­
ness is discernablc and in ful­
fillment of the promises of
Christ a new day of peace
and -………^— righteousness has truly
daw ned for the whole world.
„ . —. . ” ,

oregon_newspaper_archive_1926-05-29_ed-1_seq-1.pdf
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Article Title: The advocate., May 29, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: May 29, 1926

0 : “Special to The Advocate
(Hy I.oui» CrrKory)
An event of transcendent
importance to America, as
well as to all races and na­
tions of the world, is the an­
nual convention of the Ba­
ha’is of the United States
and Canada, recently held in
the city «f San Francisco and
bringing together hundreds
of delegates and visiting
friends front many cities, and
representing various schools
of thought, divers races, re­
ligions and nationalities, all
of whom have found recon­
ciliation and peace and have
worked out a happy mode of
living through the Bahá’í
teachings. These inspired
writings present to the world
a peace-brotherhood pro­
gram by which all human el­
ements can advance to the i-
deal goal of happiness. They
apply religion in a practical
form to the needs af human­
ity They simplify those i-
deals of rectitude which all
men should pursue. Already
they have proved their spir­
itual Humiliation and power
by training a great throng
of progressive souls, East
and West, North and South,
to abandon the lower world
of hatred, prejudice and ran­
cor and to ascend into the
higher zones of love, appre­
ciation and life.
Among the foremost of
these teachings are the fol­
lowing universal principles,
as compiled from the words
of Ahdu’l Balia:
1. The onness of mankind.
2. The independent invest­
igation of Truth.
3. The foundation of all
religions is one Reality.
4. Religion must be the
cause of unity.
5. Religion must be in ac­
cord with science and reason.
6. Equality between men
and women.
7. Prejudice of all kinds
must be forgotten.
8. Universal peace.
9. Universal education.
10. Solution of the econom­
ic problem.
11. A universal language.
12. The power of the Holy ” ,

1 : ” Spirit.
Portland sent to San Fran­
cisco a fine delegation repre­
senting the local assembly of
Bahá’ís. Among these were
Miss Ella Meissner, who
made an interesting address
at one of the sessions on the
work among those of tender
years, Mr. Geo. O. Latimer,
who presided at one of the,
sessions, Mrs. E. D. Cannady
who in an address which was
greatly appreciated, present­
ed the greeting of the Na-.
tional Association for the
Advancement of Colored
People and described some
of the difficulties of life a-
mong colored Americans.
Dr. Freeman, an American
Indian who is well educated,’
was also among the notable
speakers. He entertained the
audience with a recital of In­
dian customs, told of their
high moral standards, sang
Indian lulabys, and made an
eloquent plea for greater
consideration and justice on
the part of the American peo­
ple to people of his race.
The business sessions of
the convention, although not
open to the public, yet drew
a great number of interested
inquirers. The way that
people can conduct their af­
fairs when influenced and
bound together by a spiritual
tie was a model worthy of
study. Mr. Roy C. Wilhelm,
a Wall street broker from
the East was elected presi­
dent. As chairmen usually;
go he was quite unconven
tional, hut kept all in a state,
of happiness by his fright
wit anci genial humor, using
his place to demonstrate the
Bahá’í teachings in action.
He was ably assisted bv Mr.
Horace Holly, the secretary.1
a distinguished author and
formerly a business man of
New York. He now occupies
the position of secretary of
the National Spiritual As­
sembly of the Bahá’ís of A-j
merica and Canada. A large
volume of business was dis-1
patched in an incredibly
short time. The convention
was kept in motion and had
(Continued on pane four) ” ,

2 : “BAHAI ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., June 05, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: June 5, 1926

0 : “Reprinted from the Daily Journal of
May 31, 1926, Portland. Oregon.
Nearly ¿00 persons, representing at
least a dozen different nationalities,
attended the inter-racial, international
and interreligious tea given Sunday
afternoon from 2;J0 to 5:30 o’clock bv
Mr. and Mrs E. D. Cannady at their
home No. 520 Fast 26th Street north
The special guests were Louis Gre­
gory, traveler and lecturer, of Wash­
ington. D. C.. and William Pickens, of
New York, field secretary of the Na­
tional Association for Advancement of
Colored People.
This is one of a series of teas given
frequently on Sunday afternoons at
the Cannadv residence, at least six
having been held during the present
year The purpose is to bring about a
better understanding between races
and religious elements, as a part of
the general movement to establish
world peace.
The afternoon’s program included
talks bv both the guests of honor,
Albert R. Vail of Chicago and Mrs.
Mae Maxwell of Montreal, Rev. John
F. Moreland, pastor of Zion A. M E
«huroh; Mrs Nathan Harrir, George
P. Eisman of the city school board;
Mrs I |. Hanilsaker, and Professor
Sell of the chair of Sociology, Reed
college; and the Rev. Uemeura of the
Japanese Methodist mission.
M. R Siato, Japanese, gave selec­
tions on the Japanese native flute, ami
was introduced by Ken Nakazawa
Japanese poet. Piano selections were
given bv Miss Nellie Franklin and
Mrs. Jessie Edwards; Mrs F. M Jas­
per sang a group of Swiss aortas; M
R Ahn. Korean, sang “The Holy Ci­
ty” in his native tongue, and 1 roffes-
sor Woodfin gave a piano selection hr
had composed for this special event.
All of the singers were accompanied
by Mrs. Olliver Wickersham
The nationalities or races represen­
ted at this unique tea included: Negro,
Japanese, Chinese, Korean, German,
Swiss, Frnrh, Spanish, Assyrian, Ar­
menian. Greek, and American The
religios represented were the Hebrew.
Bahai, Roman Catholic, ami various
branches of the Protestant churches ” ,

1 : “NOTED TEACHER AND AU­
THOR HAS BUSY STAY IN
THE CITY
Noted among visitors in Portland
this week was Dr. Albert R. Vail of
Chicago, III.
Dr. Vail arrived in the city Sunday
morning irom San Francisco, Calif or
nia where be remained ior two weeks
after the close of the 18th Annual
Convention ot the Bahi’s of luc Uni­
ted States and Canada, held in that ci­
ty. recently.
Dr. Vail spoke at the Metaphysical
Library. Mj Yamhill Street, at Mrs.
Cbloc’s Sunday morning convocation
11 o’clock upon “The Pathway to
¿spiritual Realization and Universal
Love.’ In the afternoon, at the home
Mr. and Mrs. E. D Cannady in Ir­
vington, Dr. Vail was one of the four
snecial guests. Here he spoke upon
the subject, “The New Path to Religi­
ous Unity.”
On Sunday evening he spoke at the
First Congregational Church upon
“’I’he Oneness of Mankind.”
Mon y evening _______________________ Dr. Van gave an
address at Newbcrg, Oregon in Paci-
,,c College Auditorium upon ‘The
Oneness of Mankind and S?iue Un­
tried Paths to Universal Peace.” He
spoke of the Bahai program presented
60 years ago by Baha U’llah from hi*
prison in Acca inviting the i.ations to
call a Universal Conferenc; for ihe
establishment of an International
Court of arbital justice, for the sim­
ultaneous limitation of armaments
and the establishment of the princip­
les of universal arbitration. He sug­
gested also that this world court con­
sider a universal language to be
taught in all the schools in the worid
with the mother tongue, as an aid to
the Universal Peace. He laid down the
following principes: Universal cam­
paign of education in arts, sciences,
and the oneness of mankind, the har-
moizing of science and rchgion. the
establishmet of perfect equality be­
tween men and women; closer co-op­
eration between capital and labor and
the recognition of the underlying uni­
of all existing faiths.
Tuesday he spoke at tht Metaphy­
sical Library upon “The City of Im­
mortality and the Gaate Thereto’’, at
the close of which Dr. Vail was rush­
ed to the Portland hotel where he
broadcasted from station KOIN, up­
on the subject of “WorlJ Organiza­
tion of the Most Great Peace. ‘
Wednesday «venusjs Iseapokc at the
“rrss CtuO fiicnluK ifrc fiumc uf ” ,

2 : ““rrss CtuO fiicnluK ifrc fiumc uf
Dr. H E Ingham, 1181 Harold Ave­
nue upon “Bahai Principles for Worid
Peace.” Thursday evening he gave a
lecture at the Metaphysical L.brary
under the auspices of the Bahai As­
sembly upon “The Most Successful
Persons in Human History.’ He
showed that the most influential, po­
werful and bénéficient rulers have
been, not its kings and its generals,
but its great prophets, for they have
swayed, guided, educated, and united
the lives of untold millions of people.
The dominion of Napoleon lasted for
two decades, while the dominion of
Christ, for nineteen centuries. I he
Kings and rulers of India rise and fall
and are forgotten but the Buddha il­
lumines and purifies and upbuilds the
lives of perhaps a third of the human
race for twenty five centuries. Kongu!
Dynasties rise and fall and are no
more, but Confucius sits upon ‘ii ev­
erlasting throne “the uncrowned
King of ten thousand kingdoms.’ He
then showed how this same kind of
prophetic influence is rising with its
purifying; its illuminatng power in the
great Bahai teachers. Baha’U’llah and
Abdu l Baha and through them the
Holy Spirit has united a great multi­
tude of Christians, Jews, Moham-ne-
dians, Buddhists. Confucionists and
the members of all races, into a great
spiritual brotherhood that already go­
es around the world. And thus these
great Bahai Educators are training
a great multitude in the life of Univ­
ersal Service. Universal Love, trans­
forming them from soldiers ot earth
to soldiers of the Prince of Peace.
Friday evening he adressed the
Committee for a Better Social Ord :r
at the Y M. C. A Annex at 6-*j up­
on “The Greatest Religious Discovery
of Modern Times.” At 8:15 he gave
his final adress in Portland at the Me
taphysical Library, under the auspices
of the Bahai Assembly, speaking upon
“The Truth Which Will Set The
Whole World Free.” “It is the troth”,
he said, “of the oneness of all nations
and races; of the fundamental oneuess
of religions and the need of a univer­
sal society of nations; it is the truth
of universal brotherhood and univer­
sal love as it is taught and made man­
ifest bv the great prophet who not on­
ly proclaims the truth but in his life,
is the truth.’’
Each afternoon during his stay in
Portland, at the home of Mr and Mrs.
L W I.atimer, 397 E. 38th St., North,
Dr Vail conducted a class in methods
of Spiritual teaching.
A multiplicity of engageent in thme
city prevented Dr Vail from filling an
engagement for him to adress Prof.
Laughlin’s Sociology classes at Wil-
liamette University. Salem, Oregon
on Wednesday A trip over the Col­
umbia River Highway; to Reed Col­
lege and several dinner engagements
completed Mr. Vail’s busy stay in
Portland, and he stated before leaving
the citv Friday night for Seattle, that
Portland and surrounding districts
are the most beautiful that he has
ever seen during his world travels.
Dr. Vail received fis A. B degree
from the Univ. of Chicago: his Doc­
tor of Divinity from Harvard. For 12
vears he restored a church at the
University of Illinois. He is an author
and contributor of articles to various
magazines. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., June 05, 1926, Image 2
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: June 5, 1926

0 : “Special to The Advocate
An event (By Louis of Gregory) transcendent
importance to America, as
well as to all races and na­
tions of the world, is the an­
nual convention of the Ba­
ha’is of the United States
and Canada, recently held in
the city of San Francisco and
bringing together hundreds
of delegates and visiting
friends from many cities, and
representing various schools
of thought, divers races, re­
ligions and nationalities, all
of whom have found recon­
ciliation and peace and have
worked out a happy mode of
living through the Baha’i
teachings. These inspired
writings present to the world
a peace-brotherhood pro­
gram by which all human el­
ements can advance to the i-
deal goal of happiness. They
apply religion in a practical
form to the needs af human­
ity They simplify those i-
deals of rectitude which all
men should pursue. Already
they have proved their spir­
itual ilumination and power
by training a great throng
of progressive souls. East
and West, North and South,
to abandon the lower world
of hatred, prejudice and ran­
cor and to ascend into thé
higher zones of love, appre­
ciation and life.
Among the foremost of
these teachings are the fol­
lowing universal principles,
as compiled from the words
of Abdu’l Baha :
1. Theonness of mankind.!
2. The independent invest­
igation of Truth.
3. The foundation of all
religions is one Reality.
cause 4 Rpliginn of unity. must hi the
5. Religion must be in ac­
cord with science and reason.
6. Equality between men
and women.
7. Prejudice of all kinds
must be forgotten.
8. Universal peace.
9. Universal education.
10. Solution of the econom­
ic problem.
11. A universal language.
12. The power of the Holy
Spirit.
Portland sent to San Fran­
cisco a fine delegation repre­
senting the local assembly of
Baha’is. Among these were
Miss Ella Meissner, who
made an interesting address
at one of the sessions on the
work among those of tender
years, Mr. Geo. O. Latimer,
who presided at one of the
sessions, Mrs. E. D. Cannady
who in an address which was
greatly appreciated, present-
ed the greeting of the Na-|
tional Association for the
Advancement of Colored
People and described some
of the difficulties of life a-
mong colored Americans.
I)r. Freeman, an American
Indian who is well educated,,
was also among the notable
speakers. He entertained the
audience with a recital of In­
dian customs, told of their
high moral standards, sang
Indian lulabys, and made an
eloquent plea for greater
consideration and justice on
the part of the American peo­
ple to people of his race.
The business sessions of
the convention, although not
open to the public, yet drew
a great number of interested
inquirers. The way that
people can conduct their af-!
fairs when influenced and
bound together by a spiritual
tie was a model worthy of
study. Mr. Roy C. Wilhelm,
a Wall street broker from
the East was eUtctcd presi­
dent. As chairmen usually
go he was quite unconven­
tional, but kept all in a state
of happiness by his fright
wit and genial humor, using
his place to demonstrate the
Baha’i teachings in action.!
He was ably assisted by Mr. ” ,

1 : “Horace Holly, the secretary,
a distinguished author and
formerly a business man of
I New York. He now occupies
the position of secretary of
the National Spiritual As­
sembly of the Baha’is of A-
merica and Canada. A large
volume of business was dis­
patched in an incredibly
short time. The convention
was kept in motion and had
no dull moments.
An interesting feature was
the number of messages and
greetings that came from
many American and foreign
cities. Another was the re­
port of the progress of the
work of teaching and guid­
ing souls in all parts of the
world to the path of true
freedom and light. The joy­
fulness and harmony had a
deep and far-reaching signif-
icence. A love was express­
ed that was all-embracing,
that gave clarity of vision
and bound the hearts togeth­
er.The
two public meetings
for teaching, that is. making
points of contact with the
great public, were the Ban­
quet of El Ridvan and the o-
pen meeting held in the ball
room of the Palace, one of
the largest hotels of that cos­
mopolitan city. The former
assembled more than three
hundred at the tables which
were all beautifully adorned
with flowers and favors. The
latter filled the hall to over­
flowing. In both these lumin­
ous gatherings colored A-
mericans were liberally rep­
resented, both among the
speakers and the auditors.
Music of the most entertain­
ing kind added to the joyous­
ness of both occasions. The
presence of white and color­
ed Americans, Chinese and
Japanese, all in most kindly
spirit, lent a picturesque
charm to the meetings.
Mr. LeRoy Ioas, a young
business man, presided at the
Ridvan Feast and Mrs. Ella
G. Cooper, in sounding a
note of welcome to the bril­
liant gathering said: “For­
give us if we are a little hil­
arious tonight. Such meet­
ings intoxicate us with the
wine of love of God. They
are significant of a closer u-
nity among all mankind,
with happiness as the key
note. The announcement of
Baha’u’llah, which this gath­
ering commemorates, carried
a wave of happiness all over
the world.”
Among other speakers
were Mrs. May Maxwell and
Mrs. Elizabeth Greenleaf of
Montreal, Mr. Albert Vail
and Mrs. Corinne True of
Chicago, Mrs. Stewart W.
French of Pasadena, Torao
Kawasski, the Japanese Con­
sul, Shinji Yamasoto, a boy,
and Louis G. Gregory, a col­
ored lecturer from Washing­
ton. D. C., who spoke on Ba­
ha’i courage.”
Great success attended the
public meeting for the teach­
ing and spread of the Baha’i
ideals and principles of bro­
therhood. Mr. Horace Hol­
ley presided and with fine
power of expression and ra­
diant heart made a point of
contact for each of the four
speakers. Mrs. Elizabeth
Greenleaf, told of her recent
pilgrimage to the Holy Land
and of meeting the brilliant
af-! youth, Shoghi Effendi, who
is now the Guardian of the
! Baha’i Cause. Mrs. May
Maxwell traced the history
of the movement, starting
with the Bab, the herald of
the new day of peace, and
then telling of the exalted
life and services to the world
of Baha’u’llah, the great
founder of the movement,
who though imprisoned and
exiled and meeting the most
intense opposition, yet suc-
(Continued on page four) ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., June 05, 1926, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: June 5, 1926

0 : “National Bahai Convention ” ,

1 : “(Continued from Page Two)
cecded in waving the banner
of victory over the East and
West and of drawing togath-
er peoples of every race and
religion, and of Abbu’l Balia,
his son and successor, who
shared his father’s exile and
imprisonment, hut after his
release traveled far and wide
in disseminating the Baha’i
ideals, visiting America in
1912 and shedding a wonder­
ful light upon public events.
Louis G. Gregory spoke on
the Bahá’í ideal of coopera­
tion and the oneness ot hu­
manity, demonstrating its
practical bearing upon A-
mcrican life and its applica
tiou to all races. Mr. Albert
K Vail as the last speaker
gae a very eloquent address
on the unity of all religions
and the power of the Word
of God. It now appears that
all faiths should investigate
the Baha’i Movement, which
without abrogating anything
that is valid and vital in any
religion, yet reveals thc
means of peace ami harmony
for all. To the earnest seek­
er a new spiritual conscious­
ness is discernable and in ful­
fillment of thc promises of
Christ a new «lay of peace
and righteousness has truly
dawned for the whole world. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., June 12, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: June 12, 1926

0 : “Mr. Louis G. Gregory of Washing­
ton. D. C. who has been in Seattle
the past ten days weber he went from
Portland, returned to the city Thurs­
day morning and is domiciled at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Latimer
in Rose City Park. Thursday morning
at II o’clock Mr. Gregory and the as­
sociate editor of The Advocate ad­
dressed senior classes in history at
Lincoln High School. In the after­
noon, Mr. Gregory spake to a group
at Ml. Olivet Baptist church. He was
the dinner guest of Mr. and Mrs. Can-
nady in the evening ad at night he
spoke to a small group at the home of
Mr and Mrs. J. W. 1-atimer. Friday
evening he spoke before the Bahai
Assembly at 405 Yamhill St., and on
Saturday afternoon he left for a visit
to Denver, Colo.
— ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., July 24, 1926, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: July 24, 1926

0 : “—
OGod! Make all my ideals
and thoughts one ideal and
one thought, and suffer me
)to attain an eternal, un-
changeable condition in Thy
service. ‘Abdu’l-Baha. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., August 21, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Aug. 21, 1926

0 : “Mrs. Ida M. Finch of Seattle, Wn.,
is visiting Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Lati­
mer, at their residence in Rose City
Park She spoke at the Bahai Center
Friday evening. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., August 21, 1926, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Aug. 21, 1926

0 : “M i _ j« •«•. –
eekness find humility arc
the hall mark» of faith. As
soon as a person believes him
self thc* least hit superior to
., , Beginning . * ’ r , his . . .
Otners Spiritual the decline commenced of
all unaware to himself. ’
dul Baha. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., September 25, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Sept. 25, 1926

0 : “tional League for Peace and Freedom.
who is here to conclude her speaking
lour on the Pacific coast. The pro­
gram opened with the speech of Mrs.
Josephine Othus, president of the
Housewives’ Council, and was contin-
ucd with the addresses by Ken Naka-
zawa, poet: Mrs Ida Finch, a Bahai
Tcacncr, who spent four years in Jap-
an. teaching English; Mrs Saidie Orr
Duubar, executive Secretary of the
Association (or the Prevention ol Tu-
brrculosis, and ex-President of the
Oregon State Federation of Women’s
Clubs; Rev. Frank E. Carlson, pastor
of Waverly Heights Congregational
Church, member of International Re­
lations i omiiuttee. who was sent by
the National council of Congregation­
al Churches to study the conditions in
Mexico last year; … Mrs. …. Walter ……. Van .
Nuys, ho is prominent in Presbyte-
rian church circles. ircles* Mrs Millie R
irc.es, *r. – – – – –
Trumbull, secretary Industrial Wel­
fare Commission, Oregon State; and
Mr- Ailclic W. Hunton, the guest of
honour. Mrs Hunton is a quiet, unas­
suming person and »poke in her own
charming way about the need of in­
ternational and interracial understand­
ing and harmony as the essence of
world peace and advancement. She is
the house-guest of Mr and Mrs. Can­
nady and sent her message also from
the pulpits at Rose City Park M E.
Church to the young people of the
church; Central Presbyterian Church
in Laurelhurst Sunday evening and
night and from Reed College Chapel
Tuesday noon.
Hut the party was not entirely made
up of speeches, for the guests were
treated to a number of musical selec­
tions Mrs. Shirley McCanns, charm­
ing leader of Roland Hayes Quartet,
sang a group of Negro Spirituals, K.
Y. Ahn, a talented student from Ko­
rea, accompanied by Mrs. Olliver
Wickersham, who is prominent in M
E. Church circles contributed their
share of melody; the Missess Nellie
Franklin and Nellie Allen played pi­
ano piece*.
Distinguished among those present,
there were K. Uyemura. pastor of the
lapanese M. E. Church, Miss Deborah
Williams of Omaha. Mrs W. F. Smith
ex-president of Oregon State Federa­
tion of Colored Women’s Clubs and
a president of the Old Rose Club;
Mrs. H M. Esterley. vice-principal of
the Cady Music Education School;
Miss Trevett of the Oregon Consum­
ers’ League; Mrs. A A Knowlton and
her mother. Mrs. Griffin: Mrs. F. L.
Griffin and her mother, Mrs. Cham­
bers, the last four named of Reed Col­
lege; Harold S. Gilbert of the Gilbert
Piano Company and a member of the ” ,

1 : “—
Miss Helen Pilkington addressed
the Bahai Assembly at its regular
meeting on Friday evening Sept. 17.
— ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., October 16, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Oct. 16, 1926

0 : “Qn K„dav afu.rnoon. October 8th
a, lhc home of XIrs A H Beeson,
on G|inn Avenuc in Alameda. Mrs.
E. D. Cannady spoke for forty minu-
tes on J,u w fD solve the race problem
to more than half a hundred women
of the Home and Foreign Mission-
.itv Socle Hr oi the United Presbyte­
rian church. Her address w»s well re-
cicvcd and at its close, she was pre­
sented a beautiful bouquet of gladio-
las and asters bv one of the mem­
bers who, in fitting terms thanked the
speaker for her tunelv discourse.
* In •» the ms, v evening * v ii s, v/ o( tux. the ooiiis. same uo day, y |
around on Mr*. hi Cannadv a made a brief
fore thf rcKU|ar niee,iK Df the Bahais
al ^ Yamhill Street and introduced
Mrs Shir|ev McCanns who gave a
talk on Negro music and demonstra-
ted some of the spirituels. Miss Faye
Swain accompanied Mrs. McCanns
on the piano
Her talk and singing made a deep
impression on thr mind- and hearts
of her hearer: who c«rrest their ap­
preciation in many w;ys. “

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Article Title: The advocate., November 20, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Nov. 20, 1926

0 : “(Special)
Fifty six Portland citizens
representative of several ra­
cial groups and nationalities
sat at a banquet table in the
A. & H. Sw’ect Shoppe, Mon­
day evening at 6 o’clock and
mingled their voices in praise
of Mrs. Alice M. llandsaker,
wife of Rev. j. J. llandsaker,
for her great work toward
bringing about a better un­
derstanding between the va­
rious races iti the communi­
ty and for unselfish life spent
in the service of humanity.
As one guest described the
gathering: “Just a beautiful
flower garden with the white
and yellow and brown races
harmonizing as the white
and yellow and brown chry­
santhemums that adorned
the center of the table.
The occasion was a belat-
ed Birthdiy surprise party
and imagine Mrs. llandsak-
er’s surprise when she called
at the Sweet Shoppe in re­
sponse to Mrs. Cannady’s re­
quest to “pick up a package
and bring out to me when
vou come”, in finding this
large group of friends who a-
rose as she entered and sho­
wered her with conratula-
tionsand Birthday greetings
amid deafening applause! It
was sometime- beforc- she
realized what it was all a-
bout.
There was about an equal
division of the white and
coloured races present. Mrs.
Millie R. Trumbull, another
great servant of humanity,
was the gracious and witty
toastmistress who kept ev­
ery one present in the high-
est of spirits.
Those who spoke were as
follows: Mrs. E. 1). Cannady
who sponsored the atfair,
and who acted as hostess;
Miss Sarah Evans, Inspect-
or of the Public Markets;
Dr. Elbert E. Booker, Den-
tist; Miss Helen Pilkington
who brought greetings from
the youth of Portland; Rev.
John F. Moreland, pastor of
First A. M. E. /ion church;
Mr. George Orr Latimer, of
the local Bahai Assembly;
Mrs. W. F. Smith, Ex-Prcs-
ident of the State Federa­
tion of Colored Women’s ” ,

1 : “Rev John F. Moreland addressed
the Bahai Assembly Friday night His
subject: “What Think Ye of Christ?”
Mrs. F. D. Cannady sang. ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., November 27, 1926, Page PAGE TWO, Image 2
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Nov. 27, 1926

0 : “Rev. G. G. Gardnes, past­
or of Montavilla Baptist
Church wishes to thank the
Salvation Army and the kind
Bahai friends for the gener­
ous bags of food to be dis­
tributed among his needy
parishonera for Thanksgiv­
ing. A number were made
more happy than they had
been for a long time by rea­
son of this generosity.
Entertains For Newly Weds ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., December 04, 1926, Page Page 3, Image 3
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Dec. 4, 1926

0 : “Continued from pa«« one
prominent church woman;
Mrs. E. D.^annady, Associ­
ate editor of The Advocate;
Miss Bird, President of the
Zion C. E.; Mr. Brady, rep­
resenting the Loyal Comrad­
es; Mr. Vernon Baker, rep­
resenting the Sunday School
of Zion and Mr. K. D. Can-
nady, editor of The Advo­
cate and Mrs. Dora Gulliford
representing the local Bahai
Assembly. Rev. and Mrs.
Moreland in fitting words,
responded. Delicious refresh
incuts were served to the ex­
cellent group gathered to do
honor to these two youth­
ful workers for the upbuild­
ing of humanity, who have
won the respect and love of
a large number of the people
of both races. A number of
their white friends and ad­
mirers were also present.
The spirit manifested dur­
ing the entire evening was
one of love and good-will.
The high note reached du­
ring the evening was the
sincere desire to see Zion a
gain take her lead among the
local colored churches.
The leading women in the
church arranged the recep­
tion, including Mesdamcs: L.
A. Ashford, C. A. Jenkins,
Catherine Gray, Lena Bow­
ers, L. M. Bird and Adah
McGill.
Several substantial tokens
were presented Rev. and
Mrs. Moreland.
— ” ,

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Article Title: The advocate., January 29, 1927, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Jan. 29, 1927

0 : “HOLY LAND VISITOR
Mr. John Bosch of Geyser-
ville, California was the in­
spiration for a gathering of
a group of colored and white
friends at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. E. D. Cannady in
Irvington Tuesday evenng.
Mr. Bosch is a leading Ba­
hai teacher and visited the
great Persian teacher, Abdul
Bahai in Haifa. He also was
with Abdul Baha in Chicago
during Abdul Baha’s visit to
America and was one of the
few Americans present when
the great spiritual leader
passed into the Unknown at
his home in Haifa.
Mr. Bosch told in his own
interesting way of his teach­
ing the great universal prin­
ciples of Brotherhood, etc.,
in many parts of the world.
He also gave a vivid . ‘•count
of his visit to the Holy Land
and other parts of the world.
Miss Marie Nadelhoffer of
Illinois State, Field secretary
and Dr. Talbot Pacific coast
Regional Director of thc
Near East Relief, both gave
interesting and touching ac­
counts of the condition of
the Near East children and
, their need for America’s
help.
Mr. Young accompanied
on the piano by his wife,
sang a group of songs to the
delight of all.
Thc hostess, assisted by
Mrs. Idela Shirkey and Miss
Helen Pilkington served a
light supper.-o— “

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